Translate

Tupac Amaru Shakur, " I'm Loosing It...We MUST Unite!"

Saturday, February 29, 2020

What Is The Best Medicare Supplement Plan For You?

Finding The Best Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan

If you qualify for Medicare coverage, you need to know what the best Medicare Supplement insurance plan is for you. Our review will highlight important rules and benefits of Medicare Supplement insurance plans and how to pick the right one for you.

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan Basics

Medicare Supplement insurance plans are health insurance plans issued by private insurance companies. They work with, or supplement, Original Medicare by helping to cover out-of-pocket expenses. Unlike Medicare Advantage plans, however, they do not replace Original Medicare coverage.

As we’ll discuss below, Medicare Supplement plans fill in some of the cost coverage gaps in Original Medicare. Because of this, Medicare Supplement plans are often referred to as Medigap plans.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Medigap coverage, you must be enrolled in both Part A and B of Original Medicare. In many states, you must be age 65 or older even if you enter Medicare earlier due to health or disability.

Enrollment Windows

The best time to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan is when you first enroll in Part B. The six months after you enroll in Part B is called your Medigap Open Enrollment Period. During these six months, you cannot be declined for coverage or charged a higher rate due to health issues.

During your Open Enrollment Period, you have Guaranteed Issue rights. If you don’t enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan during this time period you may have to go through underwriting if you want a Medigap plan later.

If you go through underwriting you will be asked health questions. Your coverage could be declined, or you could be charged a higher premium due to health conditions. It is far better to enroll during your Medigap Open Enrollment Period.

There are times when you may be able to have extra Guaranteed Issue rights to a Medigap plan. You may be able to get a Medigap plan with Guaranteed Issue rights in these cases:

  • You enrolled in Medicare Advantage when you first got Part B, and you’ve been on it for less than 12 months (Trial Right).
  • You enrolled in Medigap when you were first eligible but dropped your coverage for your first Medicare Advantage plan, and you’ve been on it for less than 12 months (Trial Right).
  • Your Medicare Advantage plan loses or fails to renew its contract with the government.
  • You permanently move out of your Medicare Advantage plan’s service area.

There can be other reasons you’d qualify for Guaranteed Issue rights. They can be technical, so it’s recommended that you speak with an independent professional if you think you may qualify.

Costs

As mentioned earlier, Medicare Supplement insurance works with Original Medicare. You must be enrolled in both Part A and B in order to get Medigap coverage. You will also need to obtain prescription drug coverage from a standalone prescription drug plan since Medigap plans don’t cover drugs.

When you use Medigap in conjunction with Original Medicare and a standalone drug plan, you can expect to pay the following premiums:

  • Part B premium
  • Medicare Supplement plan premium
  • Prescription drug plan premium

Specifics Of Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans

Medicare Supplement insurance plans fill in some or all of the gaps in Original Medicare. These gaps can include:

  • Part A deductible – $1,408 in 2020
  • Part B deductible – $198 in 2020
  • Part B coinsurance – 20% of the cost for each Part B procedure
  • Emergency services while traveling internationally

Medicare Supplement insurance comes in 10 standardized “plans.” Each plan offers slightly different coverage. The premium for each plan is different, too, increasing with the comprehensiveness of coverage.

Plan A

Plan A provides basic coverage. It covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.

Plan A does not provide coverage for:

  • Skilled nursing care coinsurance.
  • Part A deductible.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency.

Plan B

Plan B provides slightly more comprehensive coverage. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.

Plan B does not cover:

  • Skilled nursing care coinsurance.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency.

Plan C

Plan C is a comprehensive plan. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan C does not cover Part B excess charges.

Plan D

Plan D is not quite as comprehensive as plan C. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan D does not cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Plan F

Plan F is the most comprehensive plan available. It fills in every gap in Original Medicare. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan F is also available in a high deductible version. With High Deductible F, you pay the first $2,340 (for 2020) and then the plan pays the rest of your Medicare-approved expenses. In exchange for the deductible, premiums are much lower than for regular Plan F.

Plan F has been the most popular Medicare Supplement insurance plan over the years. People choose it because they like the ability of not making any out-of-pocket payments for health care services.

Plan G

Plan G is the next most comprehensive. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan G does not cover the Part B deductible. You must pay the first $198 (for 2020) of Part B services. The plan will pay 100% of all other Medicare-approved expenses.

Plan G is available in a high deductible version. For 2020, the deductible is $2,340. After you’ve paid this amount the plan will begin paying benefits for Medicare-approved expenses.

Now that Plan F is no longer available for people new to Medicare (see more below), Plan G is the most popular Medigap plan. People choose Plan G because they know that the most they’ll spend on Medicare-approved expenses is $198 – the Part B deductible.

Plan K

Plan K is a hybrid plan that offers partial coverage with a hard out-of-pocket maximum amount. Plan K covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • 50% of Part A deductible.
  • 50% of Part B coinsurance charges.
  • 50% of the cost of your first 3 pints of blood.
  • 50% of Part A hospice care charges.
  • 50% of skilled nursing care charges.
  • Annual out-of-pocket maximum is $5,880.

Plan K doesn’t cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan L

Plan L is another hybrid type with partial coverage for many services combined with a low out-of-pocket maximum. Plan L covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • 75% of Part A deductible.
  • 75% of Part B coinsurance charges.
  • 75% of the cost of your first 3 pints of blood.
  • 75% of Part A hospice care charges.
  • 75% of skilled nursing care charges.
  • Annual out-of-pocket maximum is $2,940.

Plan L does not provide any coverage for:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan M

Plan M is a fairly comprehensive plan with coverage for most of the gaps in Original Medicare. It covers:

  • 50% of Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan M does not cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Plan N

Plan N resembles traditional employer-provided health insurance. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan N is unique in that you pay small copays for seeing a doctor or using emergency services. Your copay is no more than $20 to see a doctor and no more than $50 to be seen in the emergency room.

Plan N doesn’t cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Changes To Medicare Supplement Insurance In 2020

Plans C, F, and High deductible F will not be available for people who enter Medicare on or after January 1, 2020. If your Medicare coverage began before January 1, 2020 you will always have the right to enroll in these three plans, assuming you qualify for Guaranteed Issue rights, or can be approved by underwriting.

Extra Benefits

The benefits listed above are all standardized; they must be provided by all Medigap plans in every state except Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts. These three states have their own rules for Medicare Supplement insurance.

Many insurance companies offer extra benefits to their customers. These benefits can vary by state and are not guaranteed. Some of these extras include:

  • Discounts on vision coverage.
  • Discounts on hearing coverage.
  • Discounts on prescription drugs.
  • Discounts on dental coverage.
  • Gym memberships or fitness programs.
  • Access to 24-hour nurse help lines.

Choosing The Best Medicare Supplement Plan For You

Getting your Medigap coverage right is important for your health and financial future. To get the best Medigap plan for you you’ll need to balance your monthly premium cost with your tolerance for out-of-pocket expenses.

You’ll want a plan that has the right blend of coverage, extra benefits, and price. Not all insurance companies offer plans in every state, so be sure to connect with a professional to get quotes and find a plan in your area.



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/2PyqngX

What Is The Best Medicare Supplement Plan For You?

Finding The Best Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan

If you qualify for Medicare coverage, you need to know what the best Medicare Supplement insurance plan is for you. Our review will highlight important rules and benefits of Medicare Supplement insurance plans and how to pick the right one for you.

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan Basics

Medicare Supplement insurance plans are health insurance plans issued by private insurance companies. They work with, or supplement, Original Medicare by helping to cover out-of-pocket expenses. Unlike Medicare Advantage plans, however, they do not replace Original Medicare coverage.

As we’ll discuss below, Medicare Supplement plans fill in some of the cost coverage gaps in Original Medicare. Because of this, Medicare Supplement plans are often referred to as Medigap plans.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Medigap coverage, you must be enrolled in both Part A and B of Original Medicare. In many states, you must be age 65 or older even if you enter Medicare earlier due to health or disability.

Enrollment Windows

The best time to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan is when you first enroll in Part B. The six months after you enroll in Part B is called your Medigap Open Enrollment Period. During these six months, you cannot be declined for coverage or charged a higher rate due to health issues.

During your Open Enrollment Period, you have Guaranteed Issue rights. If you don’t enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan during this time period you may have to go through underwriting if you want a Medigap plan later.

If you go through underwriting you will be asked health questions. Your coverage could be declined, or you could be charged a higher premium due to health conditions. It is far better to enroll during your Medigap Open Enrollment Period.

There are times when you may be able to have extra Guaranteed Issue rights to a Medigap plan. You may be able to get a Medigap plan with Guaranteed Issue rights in these cases:

  • You enrolled in Medicare Advantage when you first got Part B, and you’ve been on it for less than 12 months (Trial Right).
  • You enrolled in Medigap when you were first eligible but dropped your coverage for your first Medicare Advantage plan, and you’ve been on it for less than 12 months (Trial Right).
  • Your Medicare Advantage plan loses or fails to renew its contract with the government.
  • You permanently move out of your Medicare Advantage plan’s service area.

There can be other reasons you’d qualify for Guaranteed Issue rights. They can be technical, so it’s recommended that you speak with an independent professional if you think you may qualify.

Costs

As mentioned earlier, Medicare Supplement insurance works with Original Medicare. You must be enrolled in both Part A and B in order to get Medigap coverage. You will also need to obtain prescription drug coverage from a standalone prescription drug plan since Medigap plans don’t cover drugs.

When you use Medigap in conjunction with Original Medicare and a standalone drug plan, you can expect to pay the following premiums:

  • Part B premium
  • Medicare Supplement plan premium
  • Prescription drug plan premium

Specifics Of Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans

Medicare Supplement insurance plans fill in some or all of the gaps in Original Medicare. These gaps can include:

  • Part A deductible – $1,408 in 2020
  • Part B deductible – $198 in 2020
  • Part B coinsurance – 20% of the cost for each Part B procedure
  • Emergency services while traveling internationally

Medicare Supplement insurance comes in 10 standardized “plans.” Each plan offers slightly different coverage. The premium for each plan is different, too, increasing with the comprehensiveness of coverage.

Plan A

Plan A provides basic coverage. It covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.

Plan A does not provide coverage for:

  • Skilled nursing care coinsurance.
  • Part A deductible.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency.

Plan B

Plan B provides slightly more comprehensive coverage. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.

Plan B does not cover:

  • Skilled nursing care coinsurance.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency.

Plan C

Plan C is a comprehensive plan. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan C does not cover Part B excess charges.

Plan D

Plan D is not quite as comprehensive as plan C. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan D does not cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Plan F

Plan F is the most comprehensive plan available. It fills in every gap in Original Medicare. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan F is also available in a high deductible version. With High Deductible F, you pay the first $2,340 (for 2020) and then the plan pays the rest of your Medicare-approved expenses. In exchange for the deductible, premiums are much lower than for regular Plan F.

Plan F has been the most popular Medicare Supplement insurance plan over the years. People choose it because they like the ability of not making any out-of-pocket payments for health care services.

Plan G

Plan G is the next most comprehensive. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan G does not cover the Part B deductible. You must pay the first $198 (for 2020) of Part B services. The plan will pay 100% of all other Medicare-approved expenses.

Plan G is available in a high deductible version. For 2020, the deductible is $2,340. After you’ve paid this amount the plan will begin paying benefits for Medicare-approved expenses.

Now that Plan F is no longer available for people new to Medicare (see more below), Plan G is the most popular Medigap plan. People choose Plan G because they know that the most they’ll spend on Medicare-approved expenses is $198 – the Part B deductible.

Plan K

Plan K is a hybrid plan that offers partial coverage with a hard out-of-pocket maximum amount. Plan K covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • 50% of Part A deductible.
  • 50% of Part B coinsurance charges.
  • 50% of the cost of your first 3 pints of blood.
  • 50% of Part A hospice care charges.
  • 50% of skilled nursing care charges.
  • Annual out-of-pocket maximum is $5,880.

Plan K doesn’t cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B coinsurance.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan L

Plan L is another hybrid type with partial coverage for many services combined with a low out-of-pocket maximum. Plan L covers:

  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • 75% of Part A deductible.
  • 75% of Part B coinsurance charges.
  • 75% of the cost of your first 3 pints of blood.
  • 75% of Part A hospice care charges.
  • 75% of skilled nursing care charges.
  • Annual out-of-pocket maximum is $2,940.

Plan L does not provide any coverage for:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan M

Plan M is a fairly comprehensive plan with coverage for most of the gaps in Original Medicare. It covers:

  • 50% of Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan M does not cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Plan N

Plan N resembles traditional employer-provided health insurance. It covers:

  • Part A deductible.
  • Part A coinsurance charges.
  • Part B coinsurance charges.
  • Part B excess charges.
  • First 3 pints of blood.
  • Part A hospice care charges.
  • Skilled nursing care charges.
  • Foreign travel emergency coverage.

Plan N is unique in that you pay small copays for seeing a doctor or using emergency services. Your copay is no more than $20 to see a doctor and no more than $50 to be seen in the emergency room.

Plan N doesn’t cover:

  • Part B deductible.
  • Part B excess charges.

Changes To Medicare Supplement Insurance In 2020

Plans C, F, and High deductible F will not be available for people who enter Medicare on or after January 1, 2020. If your Medicare coverage began before January 1, 2020 you will always have the right to enroll in these three plans, assuming you qualify for Guaranteed Issue rights, or can be approved by underwriting.

Extra Benefits

The benefits listed above are all standardized; they must be provided by all Medigap plans in every state except Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts. These three states have their own rules for Medicare Supplement insurance.

Many insurance companies offer extra benefits to their customers. These benefits can vary by state and are not guaranteed. Some of these extras include:

  • Discounts on vision coverage.
  • Discounts on hearing coverage.
  • Discounts on prescription drugs.
  • Discounts on dental coverage.
  • Gym memberships or fitness programs.
  • Access to 24-hour nurse help lines.

Choosing The Best Medicare Supplement Plan For You

Getting your Medigap coverage right is important for your health and financial future. To get the best Medigap plan for you you’ll need to balance your monthly premium cost with your tolerance for out-of-pocket expenses.

You’ll want a plan that has the right blend of coverage, extra benefits, and price. Not all insurance companies offer plans in every state, so be sure to connect with a professional to get quotes and find a plan in your area.



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/2PyqngX

Sweet Baby Ray's Is the Best Dipping Sauce, According to Our Readers

Although most of the options nominated weren’t dipping sauces at all (turns out, even true democracy is flawed), Sweet Baby Ray’s BBQ sauce has been elected the best dipping sauce by our readers after two rounds of voting. Sweet Baby Ray’s took home 1,039 votes, almost half the total at 43%.

Read more...



from The Root https://ift.tt/3ckFbtk

Spotify celebrates Black History with Pop-Up honoring Black artists with performances by 6LACK And DJ Olivia Dope

Spotify on Friday hosted a VIP preview in New York City of its immersive exhibit-style pop-up celebrating Black History Is Now: Phenomenal Black Music, featuring a special performance by singer, rapper and songwriter 6LACK and DJ Olivia Dope. The opening party was an exclusive first look at Spotify’s celebration of the songs and women that have shaped the way music is made, experienced, and replicated across the world.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – FEBRUARY 28: DJ Olivia Dope performs at the Spotify Celebrates Black History Is Now Pop-Up on February 28, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Spotify)

The pop-up event celebrates 32 phenomenal songs and women, such as Missy Elliot, Janet Jackson, Bob Marley, Mary J. Blige, Sade, Lauren Hill and breaking new artists such as Lil Nas X and Lizzo.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – FEBRUARY 28: An interior view of Spotify Celebrates Black History Is Now Pop-Up on February 28, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Spotify)

The exhibit features a look into the songs and artists with stories curated by music journalist Jewel Wicker, interactive elements curated by the Spotify creative team, surprise merch drops, and performances and panels. Spotify also partnered with Levis’s and guest were able to customize Levi Jackets with patches designed by Joe Freshgoods and Jamilla Okuba

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – FEBRUARY 28: A guest attends Spotify Celebrates Black History Is Now Pop-Up on February 28, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Spotify)

The pop-up event opens to the public in NYC on Saturday, February 29th and Sunday, March 1st.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – FEBRUARY 28: An exterior view of Spotify Celebrates Black History Is Now Pop-Up on February 28, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Spotify)

 Black History is Now has seen collaborations with Janelle Monáe and Pharrell Williams, two artists who consistently use their voices to advocate and express Black excellence. 

The post Spotify celebrates Black History with Pop-Up honoring Black artists with performances by 6LACK And DJ Olivia Dope appeared first on TheGrio.



from TheGrio https://ift.tt/3af9Czp

Andre Iguodala Talks How Basketball and Investing Are Similar

Andre Iguodala

Miami Heat’s Andre Iguodala is a three-time NBA champion having won titles with his former team the Golden State Warriors. He is a current member of the Miami Heat after being traded in the off-season to the Memphis Grizzlies who recently traded him to the Heat. He is also a successful businessman when not navigating a round, orange bouncing ball into a basket.

The successful entrepreneur and startup investor, funded more than 40 companies including Zoom, Datadog, PagerDuty, and Allbirds. As an investor and a member of the board of directors for Jumia Technologies, Iguodala helped the company grow and go public in April 2019 with a billion-dollar IPO. He also serves as a board adviser at enterprise software company Zuora.

He recently joined Comcast Ventures, the venture capital affiliate of Comcast Corp., as a venture partner. As a basketball player and entrepreneur, Iguodala tells Crunchbase that there are similarities in mindset between the two. “I just joined a new team, the Miami Heat, in basketball, and one here at Catalyst. With the Heat, I was hyper-focused my first couple of times on the court. While every team runs the same plays, each one has different terminologies for them. So I’ve been watching and learning on the fly, and having to figure out things fast.”

“It’s similar in the tech space. There’s different terminology and different acronyms for different industries and teams. Different companies have different vibes, some are more laid back and others are more buttoned-up. I have had to learn how to add value to different cultures within companies in the same way as I have with different teams.”

“There’s lots of egos on both sides. I thought it was just in the sports world, but I see it too in tech in other VCs, entrepreneurs or the best engineers. So I’ve had to learn how to deal with different personalities in both sports and investing. I’ve also learned to adapt and learn about different industries, from consumer to enterprise brands for example.”

He also explained how he ended up in this space: “About 8 or 9 years ago, I started seeing a large return in the tech sector in the public markets. From there, I got interested and wanted to dive deeper into learning how I could invest before companies hit the public markets. I started seeing the growth in the private space, and that eventually led to where I am now.”

As far as his most recent collaboration with Comcast Ventures?

“I’m really excited because what we’re doing with the Catalyst Fund and what we represent is investing in underrepresented communities, and determining how we can put them in our ecosystem and help them grow in a responsible and sustainable way.”

“Being a minority, you have to have a grander scope in terms of the people you deal with on a daily basis. Many of us have that back against the wall mentality, and a passion and grit.”

“Every morning I wake up with a chip on my shoulder and know I have to wake up with that passion and juice to go and prove myself. I’ve learned that I have to sacrifice, work hard and step up when it’s my turn. I’m ready to help other unconventional founders, and founders who are underrepresented in funding in the tech space, in their own journey.”



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/3888EUk

Andre Iguodala Talks How Basketball and Investing Are Similar

Andre Iguodala

Miami Heat’s Andre Iguodala is a three-time NBA champion having won titles with his former team the Golden State Warriors. He is a current member of the Miami Heat after being traded in the off-season to the Memphis Grizzlies who recently traded him to the Heat. He is also a successful businessman when not navigating a round, orange bouncing ball into a basket.

The successful entrepreneur and startup investor, funded more than 40 companies including Zoom, Datadog, PagerDuty, and Allbirds. As an investor and a member of the board of directors for Jumia Technologies, Iguodala helped the company grow and go public in April 2019 with a billion-dollar IPO. He also serves as a board adviser at enterprise software company Zuora.

He recently joined Comcast Ventures, the venture capital affiliate of Comcast Corp., as a venture partner. As a basketball player and entrepreneur, Iguodala tells Crunchbase that there are similarities in mindset between the two. “I just joined a new team, the Miami Heat, in basketball, and one here at Catalyst. With the Heat, I was hyper-focused my first couple of times on the court. While every team runs the same plays, each one has different terminologies for them. So I’ve been watching and learning on the fly, and having to figure out things fast.”

“It’s similar in the tech space. There’s different terminology and different acronyms for different industries and teams. Different companies have different vibes, some are more laid back and others are more buttoned-up. I have had to learn how to add value to different cultures within companies in the same way as I have with different teams.”

“There’s lots of egos on both sides. I thought it was just in the sports world, but I see it too in tech in other VCs, entrepreneurs or the best engineers. So I’ve had to learn how to deal with different personalities in both sports and investing. I’ve also learned to adapt and learn about different industries, from consumer to enterprise brands for example.”

He also explained how he ended up in this space: “About 8 or 9 years ago, I started seeing a large return in the tech sector in the public markets. From there, I got interested and wanted to dive deeper into learning how I could invest before companies hit the public markets. I started seeing the growth in the private space, and that eventually led to where I am now.”

As far as his most recent collaboration with Comcast Ventures?

“I’m really excited because what we’re doing with the Catalyst Fund and what we represent is investing in underrepresented communities, and determining how we can put them in our ecosystem and help them grow in a responsible and sustainable way.”

“Being a minority, you have to have a grander scope in terms of the people you deal with on a daily basis. Many of us have that back against the wall mentality, and a passion and grit.”

“Every morning I wake up with a chip on my shoulder and know I have to wake up with that passion and juice to go and prove myself. I’ve learned that I have to sacrifice, work hard and step up when it’s my turn. I’m ready to help other unconventional founders, and founders who are underrepresented in funding in the tech space, in their own journey.”



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/3888EUk

A Detroit community staple: James H Cole, Home for Funerals after 100 years

One of Detroit’s family-owned and operated funeral homes, James H. Cole is celebrating 100 years. If the Cole family were ever to teach a class on surviving 100 years; lesson number one would be to give the customers what they want. “The biggest thing that allowed us to take this company more than 100 years is dedication,” says Anthony Green, 4th generation Funeral Director for James H. Cole Home for Funerals.

 

“Of course the family has to be dedicated because it takes generations to be dedicated not only to the business that you’re in but also to the customers and the families that you serve. The funeral industry is a ministry. You have to be of service to the people and treat like family. That’s how we’ve made it this far.”

READ MORE: BEYA awards honor successful Black working engineers

The average life cycle of a successful business in America is roughly 12 to 15 years, a significant decrease from the 1920s when the average expectancy was closer to 67 years, according to a Yale University study. One reason James H. Cole has survived longer than expected is largely due to their word of mouth. “James H. Cole has been a household name for as long as I can remember. Even within my family, coming from a family of funeral directors, it has always been a funeral home that every funeral home has looked up to,” says India Ramsey, Mortician and Funeral Director at James H. Cole Home for Funerals.  “There are no classes in mortuary school on being patient and being kind. You have to want to do it. Being a funeral director has to be a calling.” 

2020 marks 101 years that the Cole family has been making a lasting impression on Detroiters.

 

 

READ MORE: Why more than 1,000 Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. members swarmed Capitol Hill this week

“I believe when I really saw the impact that my father and my grandfather had on the community was probably when my father passed away,” says 3rd generation, Karla M. Cole-Green, President of James H. Cole. “It was just droves and droves of people that were coming and wanted to see him. I was asked to get more memorial programs printed because people that weren’t able to come to the service wanted copies. I could see then what he had done for the community and I was so proud of him.”

The business owes its beginning to the grandson of a freed slave, James H. Cole, Sr. whom it is named after. His descendants aren’t exactly sure of the motive that compelled him to start a funeral business but they do know that he completed an apprenticeship with a local undertaker to gain the skills needed to service and bury the newly deceased. He opened the doors in Detroit’s Black bottom neighborhood in 1919 provided a high demand service to black families that were turned away from caucasian undertakers.

READ MORE: Erika James becomes first woman and African American named dean of Penn’s Wharton school

James. H. Cole flourished during the depression and even the riots evolving into the 21st century with two state of the art locations on the city’s west side.

“We have been able to stay relevant even after all these years because of my sons,” says Karla Cole. “They are 21st century people that are into the latest technology allowing us to stay vibrant for the past 10-15 years and they keep us growing and I thank God that the Lord has blessed me with these boys.”

 

The post A Detroit community staple: James H Cole, Home for Funerals after 100 years appeared first on TheGrio.



from TheGrio https://ift.tt/32Bf6lD

Juvenile performs ‘Back That Azz Up’ at Tom Steyer rally

Presidential candidate Tom Steyer is trending and it has nothing to do with his political views.

The billionaire Democrat ended his South Carolina campaign Friday night by turning up with rapper, Juvenile on stage to the 1991 hit song, “Back That Azz Up,” according to the Daily Mail.

READ MORE: Top 5 Democratic Debate Moments: The good, the bad, and the Bloomberg


Steyer visited Allen University, a historically black college in Columbia, to rally people to vote during the South Carolina presidential primary on Saturday. He brought along gospel singer, Yolanda Adams and Juvenile to perform for attendees and it turns out the event ended on a high note.

Juvenile was originally set to perform earlier in the night, but plans were derailed when the venue came across audio issues. 

“Juvie’s comin’ back out! We’re gonna let Yolanda Adams come out and then we’re coming back to shut this bitch down for y’all!” Juvenile’s hype man told the crowd as they were waiting, according to BuzzFeed

When Juvenile finally took the stage, he brought Steyer out to join him. That’s when the politician took the mic and performed his best dance moves in front of the crowd. Based on the videos, it looks like they were definitely entertained.

On a more serious note, Steyer spoke in front of attendees about racial injustice and other issues during his 11-minute speech during the event.

READ MORE: OPINION: The Democratic Debate circus needs to end

Steyer revealed this week that he needs to rank top three in the red state to maintain his candidacy in the presidential race, according to the Washington Examiner. He added, “I think I have done best with black people. I have done best with Latinos. I think that, when we get to the diverse Democratic electorate, when we get to the diversity that is America and the Democratic Party, I do a lot better.”

Steyer is currently placed top three in the race. He is currently behind Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders.

Steyer’s attempt was certainly a very smart move to win over the crowd, and maybe votes. 

 

The post Juvenile performs ‘Back That Azz Up’ at Tom Steyer rally appeared first on TheGrio.



from TheGrio https://ift.tt/2TaaPCx

Lizzo faces countersuit in ‘Truth Hurts’ copyright battle

Lizzo is facing a countersuit by three songwriters who claim they did not receive proper credit for writing her highly successful song, “Truth Hurts.”

Justin and Jeremiah Raisen, as well as Justin “Yves” Rothman filed the suit Friday in federal court in California alleging that the hit is very similar to another song they composed with Lizzo called “Healthy,” according to Variety.

READ MORE: Lizzo takes legal action over allegations she stole ‘Truth Hurts’ from songwriters

The countersuit comes in response to a lawsuit Lizzo filed in October against the trio, claiming they did not help write the song. But the countersuit claims that the award-winning singer is of a “bad faith, unprincipled attempt to deny songwriting and producer credits and royalties,” according to Rolling Stone and claims that “Lizzo would never have collected her Grammy Award [for Best Pop Solo Performance] but for the songwriting and producing contributions of [the Raisens and Rothman].”

The artist initially sued writers last October to receive a determination that the men should not be credited for writing the song last October, Variety reports.

“Lizzo is a talented musician and performer who currently enjoys immense popularity based on a hit song that she did not write alone,” their attorney, Lawrence Iser, said in a statement. “The Counterclaims we filed today seek a judgment from the court that the song that is now called ‘Truth Hurts’ originated in Justin Raisen’s home recording studio from a collaboration among our clients, Justin and Jeremiah Raisen and Yves Rothman, along with Lizzo and Jesse Saint John. When the case proceeds to trial, we look forward to sharing the sound recordings, videos, photographs and musicology that 100% prove that collaboration. Our clients deserve their fair share of the recognition and revenue that comes from collaborating on a hit song.”

READ MORE: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos fans out after meeting Lizzo at the Super Bowl

The countersuit states that a musicologist found that the songs had “strikingly similar lyric and musical elements.” The songs also open with the well-known line, “I just did a DNA test / turns out I’m a 100% that b**h.” The countersuit details other similarities between the two songs as well such as Lizzo’s “vamping,” and the song’s overall structure.

Lizzo’s attorneys stated in an earlier complaint that the Raizen brothers formerly provided a written waiver of the rights to “Truth Hurts.”

Lizzon’s reps have not released a statement regarding the countersuit.

 

The post Lizzo faces countersuit in ‘Truth Hurts’ copyright battle appeared first on TheGrio.



from TheGrio https://ift.tt/2VxKsYQ

R. Kelly’s lawyer seeks to dismiss racketeering charge

An attorney for R. Kelly on Friday filed papers in Brooklyn federal court to dismiss a 12-count racketeering charge against the embattled singer.

Kelly, 53, the motion claims, shouldn’t be charged with being involved in a “criminal conspiracy” because prosecutors did not identify other members who were associated with the alleged crime, Page Six reports.

READ MORE: R. Kelly receives default judgment in latest sexual abuse civil lawsuit

Prosecutors claimed that the singer was working with managers, drivers and members of his entourage. 

“The superseding indictment is silent on how any other individual benefited from Mr. Kelly engaging in sexual activity,” defense attorney, Steven A. Greenberg said, according to  New York Daily News. “If no others benefit, then the only member of the enterprise is Mr. Kelly.”

Kelly was indicted this past July under the RICO Act, which is a federal anti-racketeering statute. The charge alleges that Kelly and others recruited women and minors to have sex with him and also threatened them to report the crime to police, The Chicago Tribune reports.

Prosecutors have to prove that the singer was the “leader” of the crime.

“Robert Kelly is not an enterprise,” Kelly’s lead attorney, Steven Greenberg, wrote in the motion. “RICO was not designed as a means to punish a single individual for his own wrongful actions. RICO is only being used in this case in an effort to subvert various statutes of limitations.”

The Brooklyn’s US Attorney’s office did not comment on the motion.

READ MORE: Syleena Johnson thinks R. Kelly fans should be allowed to enjoy his music without shame

Kelly is also facing other charges in New York. One includes the singer allegedly bribing a government official back in 1994 to obtain a fake ID to marry R&B singer Aaliyah, who was underage at the time. He is also accused of taking a woman across state lines to have sex with her.

Kelly is facing criminal cases in Manhattan and Chicago as well.

In Chicago, Kelly is charged with his association with child pornography and sexually exploiting minors.

 

 

 

The post R. Kelly’s lawyer seeks to dismiss racketeering charge appeared first on TheGrio.



from TheGrio https://ift.tt/2uEYfSc

Meet the 21-Year-Old HBCU Grad Creating His Own Dessert Company

Kolby McNeal

For Kolby McNeal, sweets were a big part of his upbringing, along with football. After graduating from the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff, the HBCU entrepreneur decided to create his own venture dedicated to the tasty desserts he loved so much.

Sweets in a Jar L.L.C. launched in Little Rock, Arkansas, as an on-the-go homemade dessert company. Known as “Cakes” among his peers, the student-athlete entered the university on a full football scholarship and worked hard to grow his creative passion into a thriving business. From a child, McNeal enjoyed creating sweets—from Vanilla Bean Crème Brûlée to experimental cakes based on his favorite treats—in between football camps and school. His first business was a sandwich-making business in middle school to raise money to buy a moped.

McNeal’s HBCU experience is deeply intertwined with his baked goods, and their names often pay homage to different cultural traditions. His first significant sale came after he started selling “Krim & Kreme,” his version of the red velvet cake as a nod to his fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi, and the ladies of Delta Sigma Theta Inc.

“My college experience has been amazing. It’s nothing like having the type of support that pushes you to pursue your dreams and gives you the foundation that you need to get there,” says McNeal. “When my coaches and teammates found out that I loved baking, they were my best customers.”

Another popular pick is “I Got the Keys” Key Lime Pie based on a television appearance he made in middle school baking his version of a key lime pie.

He also uses his desserts for good causes. When McNeal found out his older brother was diagnosed with epilepsy a few years back, he created his “Honeybun Kane” cake, based on his brother’s favorite snack growing up, with all the proceeds going to help those suffering from the illness.

“It has indeed been incredible to see the amount of support that I have received. My fraternity brothers, my teammates, my coaches, really my whole school. I guess they don’t call us ‘The Pride’ for nothing,” says McNeal. “I particularly enjoy when older women support me that are around my grandmother’s age and tell me that I give them a run for their money.”



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/2TqgTFP

Bloomberg Really Just Wants to Stop and Frisk Everybody: Democratic Candidate Defends Muslim Surveillance Program

In today’s episode of “nah-but-seriously-y’all-ain’t-really-voting-for-that-guy-right?” former NYC mayor and democratic (although I’m not sure anyone has told him yet) candidate Mike Bloomberg, in a PBS interview that aired on Thursday, adamantly defended a heavily criticized surveillance program that targeted…

Read more...



from The Root https://ift.tt/2PwLOz6

Meet the 21-Year-Old HBCU Grad Creating His Own Dessert Company

Kolby McNeal

For Kolby McNeal, sweets were a big part of his upbringing, along with football. After graduating from the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff, the HBCU entrepreneur decided to create his own venture dedicated to the tasty desserts he loved so much.

Sweets in a Jar L.L.C. launched in Little Rock, Arkansas, as an on-the-go homemade dessert company. Known as “Cakes” among his peers, the student-athlete entered the university on a full football scholarship and worked hard to grow his creative passion into a thriving business. From a child, McNeal enjoyed creating sweets—from Vanilla Bean Crème Brûlée to experimental cakes based on his favorite treats—in between football camps and school. His first business was a sandwich-making business in middle school to raise money to buy a moped.

McNeal’s HBCU experience is deeply intertwined with his baked goods, and their names often pay homage to different cultural traditions. His first significant sale came after he started selling “Krim & Kreme,” his version of the red velvet cake as a nod to his fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi, and the ladies of Delta Sigma Theta Inc.

“My college experience has been amazing. It’s nothing like having the type of support that pushes you to pursue your dreams and gives you the foundation that you need to get there,” says McNeal. “When my coaches and teammates found out that I loved baking, they were my best customers.”

Another popular pick is “I Got the Keys” Key Lime Pie based on a television appearance he made in middle school baking his version of a key lime pie.

He also uses his desserts for good causes. When McNeal found out his older brother was diagnosed with epilepsy a few years back, he created his “Honeybun Kane” cake, based on his brother’s favorite snack growing up, with all the proceeds going to help those suffering from the illness.

“It has indeed been incredible to see the amount of support that I have received. My fraternity brothers, my teammates, my coaches, really my whole school. I guess they don’t call us ‘The Pride’ for nothing,” says McNeal. “I particularly enjoy when older women support me that are around my grandmother’s age and tell me that I give them a run for their money.”



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/2TqgTFP

Report: Washington D.C Has The Highest Intensity Of Gentrification In The U.S

Building in Washington D.C

Gentrification has ravished America’s largest cities, leaving many low-income and marginalized people on the outskirts unable to afford the high cost of living in their neighborhood. And no one has been hit harder than the country’s capital city, Washington, D.C.

In 2019, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, a research and advocacy group of 600 community organizations that promote economic and racial justice, released a damning study showing the influx of gentrification has changed the makeup of the nation’s capital and how it has disfranchised the native population. The report showed that roughly 40% of D.C’s lower-income neighborhoods experienced some form of gentrification between 2000 and 2013.

This puts it just behind New York City and Los Angeles for the highest number of gentrifying neighborhoods. Nationally, at least 135,000 African Americans and Hispanics have been forced out of their neighborhoods due to increase of gentrification in their communities.

But the District ranked first in the “intensity of gentrification” based on the percentage of lower-income neighborhoods being reshaped by new residents. It is also the black residents there who have been the hardest hit by the effects of gentrification, with more than 20,000 African Americans moving out of their neighborhoods during that time.

“You feel it and you see it,” said Jesse Van Tol, chief executive of the NCRC. “It’s the visibility and the pace of it.” Van Tol said gentrification has followed a national move back to cities, particularly among affluent workers who had historically left the bigger cities for suburban neighborhoods.

D.C, also known as Chocolate City, has historically been known for its thriving black population that has shaped the local culture of the city. This effect has caused serious effects on the city’s makeup moving toward more predominantly white, affluent newcomers.

“The tens of thousands who have migrated to Washington, D.C., over the last five years live in a city that rolled out the proverbial red carpet for their arrival,” Sabiyha Prince, an activist with the group Empower DC, wrote in an essay accompanying the report. “Infrastructure has been altered, public property has been privatized, the will of voters has been rescinded, minority-owned businesses have been shuttered, and the bodies of people of color have been stopped and frisked to accommodate and enhance the respective presence and comfort of newcomers.”



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/3cttMrw

Disney+ is Bringing Back ‘The Proud Family’

The Proud Family

What’s old is new again! It has been announced that the animated series, The Proud Family is making a return to the new streaming service Disney Plus according to Deadline.

The original series creator/executive producer Bruce W. Smith and executive producer Ralph Farquhar are bringing it back along with co-executive producer and story editor Calvin Brown. The family-sitcom will have a new take and will also see the return of the original cast. The animated show debuted on the Disney Channel in 2001. The latest version will be titled The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder.

“In our minds, the show never really went away, as we still had tons of stories left to tell,” original series creator/executive producer Bruce W. Smith and executive producer Ralph Farquhar said in a statement to Deadline. “It’s the perfect time to bring back this show, and we can’t wait to take fans, old and new alike, on this journey with us.”

The new show will still center on the story of a young woman named Penny Proud and the never-dull happenings of her family, parents Oscar and Trudy, twin siblings and grandma Suga Mama. The show will feature the original cast from The Proud Family reprising their roles: Kyla Pratt as Penny, Tommy Davidson as Oscar, Paula Jai Parker as Trudy, Payton as Suga Mama, Karen Malina White as Dijonay Jones, Soleil Moon Frye as Zoey Howzer and Alisa Reyes as LaCienega Boulevardez. Cedric the Entertainer will also return as Uncle Bobby.

“The show’s humor and relatable stories are as relevant with audiences today as ever,” said Agnes Chu, SVP Content at Disney+. “Our audiences have loved rediscovering their favorite episodes of The Proud Family, and we’re excited Bruce, Ralph, Calvin, and the returning cast are creating new stories for their new home on Disney+.”

You can currently watch episodes of the original 2001-05 Disney Channel series, The Proud Family on Disney Plus.



from Black Enterprise https://ift.tt/32E9wPl

Black Faith

  • Who are you? - Ever since I saw the first preview of the movie, Overcomer, I wanted to see it. I was ready. Pumped. The release month was etched in my mind. When the time...
    11 months ago

Black Business

Black Fitness

Black Fashion

Black Travel

Black Notes

Interesting Black Links

How the pandemic is forging a new consensus on globalization

The coronavirus crisis did what President Donald Trump’s protectionist trade wars could not for years. It did what anti-globalization advoc...